NOTICE OF 2020 GENERAL ELECTION

In accordance with the provisions of the Pennsylvania Election Code notice is hereby given to the electors of Fayette County that a General Election will be held in
said county on Tuesday, November 3, 2020 between the hours of 7 A.M. and 8 P.M. prevailing time in the districts therein. The following offices are to be elected at
said election in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania and in said county. The names of the candidates for election will appear on the ballot as follows:

President of the United States/Vice-President – Vote for One – (All Precincts within Fayette County)

  • Democratic – Joseph R. Biden
    Vice-President – Kamala D. Harris
  • Republican – Donald J. Trump
    Vice-President – Michael R. Pence
  • Libertarian – Jo Jorgensen
    Vice-President – Jeremy Spike Cohen

Attorney General — Vote for One – (All Precincts within Fayette County)

  • Democratic – Josh Shapiro
  • Republican – Heather Heidelbaugh
  • Libertarian – Daniel Wassmer
  • Green Party – Richard L. Weiss

Auditor General — Vote for One – (All Precincts within Fayette County)

  • Democratic – Nina Ahmad
  • Republican – Timothy DeFoor
  • Libertarian – Jennifer Moore
  • Green Party – Olivia Faison

State Treasurer — Vote for One – (All Precincts within Fayette County)

  • Democratic – Joe Torsella
  • Republican – Stacy L. Garrity
  • Libertarian – Joe Soloski
  • Green Party – Timothy Runkle

Representative in Congress – 14th Congressional District –Vote for One –

(All Precincts within Fayette County)

  • Democratic – Bill Marx
  • Republican – Guy Reschenthaler

Representative in The General Assembly — 49th Legislative District – Vote for One –

(Belle Vernon Borough, Fayette City Borough, Franklin Township, Jefferson Township, Newell Borough, Washington Township)

  • Democratic – Randy J. Barli
  • Republican – Bud Cook

Representative in The General Assembly — 50th Legislative District – Vote for One –

(Brownsville Borough, Brownsville Township, Luzerne Township, Masontown
Borough, Redstone Township)

  • Democratic – Pam Snyder
  • Republican – Larry Yost

Representative in The General Assembly — 51st Legislative District – Vote for One –

(Fairchance Borough, Georges Township, German Township, Henry Clay Township,
Markleysburg Borough, Nicholson Township, Ohiopyle Borough, Point Marion Borough, Smithfield Borough, South Union Township, Springfield Township,
Springhill Township, Stewart Township, Uniontown City, Wharton Twp)

  • Democratic – Kevin Jones
  • Republican – Matthew Dowling

Representative in The General Assembly — 52nd Legislative District – Vote for One –

(Bullskin Township, Connellsville City, Connellsville Township, Dawson Borough,
Dunbar Borough, Dunbar Township, Everson Borough, Lower Tyrone Township, Menallen Township, North Union Township, Perry Township, Perryopolis
Borough, Saltlick Township, South Connellsville Borough, Upper Tyrone Township, Vanderbilt Borough)

  • Democratic – Harry Young Cochran
  • Republican – Ryan Warner

POLLING PLACES INACCESSIBLE FOR THE ELDERLY AND HANDICAPPED

Elderly (65 and over) or handicapped voters assigned to inaccessible polling places can vote by Alternative Ballot. Application forms and information regarding

Alternative Ballots can be obtained at the Election Bureau. Applications for Alternative Ballots must be submitted to the Election Bureau no later than 5:00 p.m. on Tuesday, October 27, 2020. In case of an emergency, you can submit an Emergency Application for Alternative Ballot which must be received by 8:00 p.m. on Election Day. Completed Alternative Ballots must be received by the Election Bureau no later than 8:00 p.m. on Election Day.

PUBLIC NOTICE

The County Board of Election will publicly commence the computation and canvassing of the returns of the votes cast at the General Election held Tuesday,
November 3, 2020 to begin at 9:00 a.m., prevailing time, Friday, November 6, 2020 and continue each day thereafter until all votes cast have been computed. The
Provisional Ballots cast will be examined on Tuesday, November 10, 2020 starting at 10:00 a.m. Both will be held at the Public Service Building, 22 East Main Street,
Uniontown, Pennsylvania.

POLLING PLACES (Polling places that are inaccessible to the elderly and handicapped, as per the Federal Voting Accessibility for the Elderly and Handicapped Act, P.L. 98-435, are labeled inaccessible).

  • Belle Vernon Borough Belle Vernon Municipal Bldg & Fire Hall, Belle Vernon (temporary change)
  • Brownsville Township Brownsville Township Shed, Brownsville
  • Brownsville Borough, Ward 1 Southside Fire Station, Brownsville
  • Brownsville Borough, Ward 2 Northside Fire Station, Brownsville
  • Brownsville Borough, Ward 3 South Hills Terrace Community Room, Brownsville
  • Bullskin Township, District 1 Bullskin Township Elementary School, Connellsville
  • Bullskin Township, District 2 Wooddale Bible Brethren Church, Mount Pleasant
  • Bullskin Township, District 3 Bear Rocks Community Center, Acme
  • Connellsville City, Ward 1 Calvary Assembly of God, Connellsville
  • Connellsville City, Ward 2 Connellsville Senior Citizens Center, McCormick Avenue Entrance, Connellsville
  • Connellsville City, Ward 3 Greater Connellsville Community Center, Connellsville
  • Connellsville City, Ward 4 New Haven Hose Company Fire Station, Connellsville
  • Connellsville Township Connellsville Township VFD, Connellsville
  • Dawson Borough Dawson Borough Building, Dawson (inaccessible)
  • Dunbar Township, District 1 Joseph A. Hardy Connellsville Airport, Terminal Building, Lemont Furnace
  • Dunbar Township, District 2 Connellsville Alliance Church, Connellsville
  • Dunbar Borough Dunbar Borough Fire Department Social Hall, Dunbar
  • Everson Borough Everson VFD Social Hall, Everson
  • Fairchance Borough Fairchance Borough Building, Fairchance
  • Fayette City Borough First Christian Church Fellowship Hall, Fayette City
  • Franklin Township, District 1 Franklin Elementary School, Vanderbilt
  • Franklin Township, District 2 Smock Community Recreation & Heritage Center, Smock
  • Georges Township, District 1 Haydentown Community Center, Smithfield
  • Georges Township, District 2 Fayette County Vocational-Technical School, Uniontown
  • Georges Township, District 3 D. Ferd Swaney Elementary School, Uniontown
  • German Township, District 1 McClellandtown Firemanʼs Social Hall, McClellandtown
  • German Township, District 2 German Township Municipal Building, McClellandtown
  • German Township, District 3 Footedale Fire Hall, New Salem
  • German Township, District 4 Adah Fire Hall, Adah
  • Henry Clay Township Mountain Fellowship Center, Markleysburg
  • Jefferson Township Jefferson Township Municipal Building, Perryopolis
  • Lower Tyrone Township Brownfield Community Center, Dawson
  • Luzerne Township, District 1 Luzerne Township Municipal Building, Brownsville
  • Luzerne Township, District 2 Hiller VFD, Hiller
  • Luzerne Township, District 3 Labelle Fire House, Labelle
  • Luzerne Township, District 4 Allison #2 Fire Hall, Allison
  • Markleysburg Borough Mayorʼs Office, Markleysburg (inaccessible)
  • Masontown Borough St. Francis of Assisi (Former All Saints School) Rear Entrance, Masontown
  • Menallen Township, District 1 Keisterville Community Center, Keisterville
  • Menallen Township, District 2 Menallen Elementary School, Uniontown
  • Menallen Township, District 3 First Christian Church of New Salem, Uniontown
  • Newell Borough Newell Borough Building, Newell
  • Nicholson Township Nicholson Township Building, Smithfield
  • North Union Township, District 1 R. W. Clark Elementary School, Uniontown
  • North Union Township, District 2 George C. Marshall Elementary School, Uniontown
  • North Union Township, District 3 Hopwood Free Methodist Church, Hopwood
  • North Union Township, District 4 VFW Post 8543, Uniontown
  • North Union Township, District 5 Valley Sportsman Club, Uniontown
  • Ohiopyle Borough Ohiopyle-Stewart Community Center, Ohiopyle
  • Perry Township Perry Township Municipal Building, Star Junction
  • Perryopolis Borough Perryopolis Borough Building, Perryopolis
  • Point Marion Borough Old Scout Hall, Point Marion
  • Redstone Township, District 1 Republic Township Municipal Building, Grindstone
  • Redstone Township, District 2 Redstone Township Recreation Center, Republic
  • Redstone Township, District 3 Colonial #3 Athletic Club Office, Rowes Run, Grindstone
  • Redstone Township, District 4 Fairbank Rod & Gun Club, Fairbank
  • Saltlick Township Saltlick Township Municipal Building, Melcroft
  • Smithfield Borough Smithfield Borough Building, Smithfield
  • South Connellsville Borough South Connellsville Borough Building, South Connellsville
  • South Union Township, District 1 Laurel Highlands Middle School, Uniontown
  • South Union Township, District 2 Hatfield Elementary School, Uniontown
  • South Union Township, District 3 Hutchinson Elementary School, Uniontown
  • Springfield Township, District 1 Normalville Fire Hall, Normalville
  • Springfield Township, District 2 Springfield Municipal Building & Fire Hall, Mill Run
  • Springhill Township Appalachian Community Center, Smithfield
  • Stewart Township Stewart Township Building, Ohiopyle
  • Uniontown City, Ward 1 Fayette County Community Action Administration Building, Uniontown
  • Uniontown City, Ward 2 Uniontown City Hall Council Chambers, Uniontown
  • Uniontown City, Ward 3 Lafayette Middle School, Uniontown
  • Uniontown City, Ward 4 East End Community Center, Uniontown
  • Uniontown City, Ward 5 Uniontown Area High School, Wilson Avenue Entrance, Uniontown
  • Uniontown City, Ward 6 Mt. Vernon Towers Apartment Building, Uniontown
  • Uniontown City, Ward 7 Benjamin Franklin Elementary-Middle School, Uniontown
  • Upper Tyrone Township Upper Tyrone Township Municipal Building, Connellsville
  • Vanderbilt Borough American Legion Home, Vanderbilt
  • Washington Township Washington Township Municipal Building, Belle Vernon
  • Wharton Township Wharton Township Municipal Building, Farmington

County Board of Elections
Dave Lohr
Vincent A. Vicites
Scott Dunn

Chief Clerk
Amy Revak

November 3, 2020 General Election Unofficial Candidate List

President of the United States/Vice-President – Vote for One– All Precincts within Fayette County

  • Democratic – Joseph R. Biden
    Vice-President – Kamala D. Harris
  • Republican – Donald J. Trump
    Vice-President – Michael R. Pence
  • Libertarian – Jo Jorgensen
    Vice-President – Jeremy Spike Cohen

Attorney General — Vote for One– All Precincts within Fayette County

  • Democratic – Josh Shapiro
  • Republican – Heather Heidelbaugh
  • Libertarian – Daniel Wassmer
  • Green Party – Richard L. Weiss

Auditor General — Vote for One — All Precincts within Fayette County

  • Democratic – Nina Ahmad
  • Republican – Timothy DeFoor
  • Libertarian – Jennifer Moore
  • Green Party – Olivia Faison

State Treasurer — Vote for One — All Precincts within Fayette County

  • Democratic – Joe Torsella
  • Republican – Stacy L. Garrity
  • Libertarian – Joe Soloski
  • Green Party – Timothy Runkle

Representative in Congress – 14th Congressional District —

Vote for One—All Precincts within Fayette County

  • Democratic – Bill Marx
  • Republican – Guy Reschenthaler

REPRESENTATIVE IN THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY –49th Legislative District

Vote for One–Belle Vernon Borough, Fayette City Borough, Franklin Township, Jefferson Township, Newell Borough, Washington Township

  • Democratic – Randy J. Barli
  • Republican – Bud Cook

REPRESENTATIVE IN THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY– 50th Legislative District –

Vote for One –Brownsville Borough, Brownsville Township, Luzerne Township, Masontown Borough, Redstone Township

  • Democratic – Pam Snyder
  • Republican – Larry Yost

REPRESENTATIVE IN THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY– 51st Legislative District –

Vote for One –Fairchance Borough, Georges Township, German Township, Henry Clay Township, Markleysburg Borough, Nicholson Township, Ohiopyle Borough, Point Marion Borough, Smithfield Borough, South Union Township, Springfield Township, Springhill Township, Stewart Township, Uniontown City, Wharton Twp

  • Democratic – Kevin Jones
  • Republican – Matthew Dowling

REPRESENTATIVE IN THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY– 52nd Legislative District –

Vote for One –Bullskin Township, Connellsville City, Connellsville Township, Dawson Borough, Dunbar Borough, Dunbar Township, Everson Borough, Lower Tyrone Township, Menallen Township, North Union Township, Perry Township, Perryopolis Borough, Saltlick Township, South Connellsville Borough, Upper Tyrone Township,
Vanderbilt Borough

  • Democratic – Harry Young Cochran
  • Republican – Ryan Warner

Representative in the General Assembly – 52nd Legislative District

For the 52nd Legislative District. Ryan James Warner and Harry Young Cochran will secure their party’s nominations for the Republican and Democratic parties respectively for the 52nd District in the General Election in the fall.

Local races include one with incumbent facing no opposition, another with primary challenge

Pennsylvania’s 2020 primary election is less than 10 weeks away, and according to information on the Department of State’s database, all U.S. Congress and state legislative races in Fayette and Greene counties and the mid-Mon Valley portions of Washington and Westmoreland counties have both Democratic and Republican candidates.

Except one.

In the 51st Legislative District, comprised of parts of Fayette and Somerset counties, state Rep. Matt Dowling, R-Uniontown, faces no opposition in his quest for a third term, having defeated former state Rep. Tim Mahoney, D-South Union Township, in 2016 and 2018.

State Rep. Ryan Warner, R-Perryopolis, will seek a fourth term in the 52nd Legislative District, which consists of parts of Fayette and Westmoreland counties. Harry Young Cochran of Connellsville, a Democrat, filed paperwork to challenge him in the fall.

In the 49th Legislative District, incumbent state Rep. Bud Cook, R-West Pike Run Township, is seeking a third term but will face a primary challenge from fellow Republican Tony Bottino Jr. of Carroll Township. Democrat Randy Barli of Coal Center also filed.

State Rep. Pam Snyder, a Democrat from Morgan Township, is seeking a fifth term in the 50th Legislative District and appears poised to face Republican Larry W. Yost II of Dunkard Township in the fall. That district encompasses small parts of Fayette and Washington counties in addition to all of Greene County.

In the 14th Congressional District, U.S. Rep. Guy Reschenthaler, R-Peters Township, will have an autumn opponent in Democrat William A. Marx of Delmont. The district includes all of Fayette, Greene and Washington counties, plus much of Westmoreland County.

The primary is April 28.

 

Candidates for Congress and the Pennsylvania Legislature run for two-year terms.

Also on the ballot along with president and statewide row office are many candidates vying to be chosen as delegates or alternates to Democratic and Republican Party presidential nominating conventions.

 

April 28, 2020 General Primary Candidate List

President of the United States – Vote for One– All Precincts within Fayette County

Democratic

  • Bernie Sanders
  • Joseph R. Biden
  • Tulsi Gabbard
  • Elizabeth Warren

Republican

  • Donald J. Trump
  • Roque Rocky De La Fuente
  • Bill Weld

Attorney General — Vote for One– All Precincts within Fayette County

Democratic

  • Josh Shapiro – Montgomery County

Republican

  • Heather Heidelbaugh – Allegheny County

Auditor General — Vote for One — All Precincts within Fayette County

Democratic

  • H. Scott Conklin – Centre County
  • Michael Lamb – Allegheny County
  • Tracie Fountain – Dauphin County
  • Rose Rosie Marie Davis – Monroe County
  • Nina Ahmad – Philadelphia County
  • Christina M. Hartman – Lancaster County

Republican

  • Timothy DeFoor – Dauphin County

State Treasurer — Vote for One — All Precincts within Fayette County

Democratic

  • Joe Torsella – Montgomery County

Republican

  • Stacy L. Garrity – Bradford County

Representative in Congress – 14th Congressional District –Vote for One—All Precincts within Fayette County

Democratic

  • Bill Marx – Westmoreland County

Republican

  • Guy Reschenthaler – Washington County

REPRESENTATIVE IN THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY –49th Legislative District – Vote for One–

Belle Vernon Borough, Fayette City Borough, Franklin Township, Jefferson Township, Newell Borough, Washington Township

Democratic

  • Randy J. Barli – Washington County

Republican

  • Bud Cook – Washington County
  • Tony Bottino – Washington County

REPRESENTATIVE IN THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY– 50th Legislative District – Vote for One

Brownsville Borough, Brownsville Township, Luzerne Township, Masontown Borough, Redstone Township

Democratic

  • Pam Snyder – Greene County

Republican

  • Larry Yost – Greene County

REPRESENTATIVE IN THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY– 51st Legislative District – Vote for One —

Fairchance Borough, Georges Township, German Township, Henry Clay Township, Markleysburg Borough, Nicholson Township, Ohiopyle Borough, Point Marion Borough, Smithfield Borough, South Union Township, Springfield Township, Springhill Township, Stewart Township, Uniontown City, Wharton Township

Democratic

Republican

  • Matthew Dowling – Fayette County

REPRESENTATIVE IN THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY– 52nd Legislative District – Vote for One

Bullskin Township, Connellsville City, Connellsville Township, Dawson Borough, Dunbar Borough, Dunbar Township, Everson Borough, Lower Tyrone Township, Menallen Township, North Union Township, Perry Township, Perryopolis Borough, Saltlick Township, South Connellsville Borough, Upper Tyrone Township, Vanderbilt Borough

Democratic

  • Harry Young Cochran – Fayette County

Republican

  • Ryan Warner – Fayette County

Delegate to the Democratic National Convention – 14th District – — Vote for Five, Three Males and Two Females — All Precincts within Fayette County

Democratic

  • Casey Konopisos (F) – Committed to: Bernie Sanders
  • Robert Sabot (M) – Committed to: Elizabeth Warren
  • Bibiana Boerio (F) – Committed to: Joseph R. Biden
  • Robert Mason (M) – Committed to: Bernie Sanders
  • Mike Cordaro (M) – Committed to: Bernie Sanders
  • Kevin D. Jones (M) – Committed to: Michael R. Bloomberg
  • Christian Sesek (M) – Committed to: Joseph R. Biden
  • Janice Foley (F) – Committed to: Bernie Sanders
  • Brayden Campbell (M) – Committed to: Bernie Sanders
  • Nate Regotti (M) – Committed to: Joseph R. Biden
  • David J. Deitrick (M) – Committed to: Pete Buttigieg

Delegate to the Republican National Convention – 14th District – — Vote for Three– All Precincts within Fayette County

Republican

  • John Ventre
  • Scott Avolio
  • Jon R. Marietta
  • Scott R. Day
  • Daryl William Price
  • Eric J. Sivavec
  • Guy Reschenthaler
  • Rose Tennent
  • Thomas J. Uram
  • Susanna DeJeet
  • Jill Cooper

Alternate Delegate to the Republican National Convention – 14th District – — Vote for Three– All Precincts within Fayette County

Republican

  • Scott R. Day
  • Sonia Stopperich Sulc
  • Thomas J. Uram
  • Pat Geho
  • Melanie Stringhill Patterson

Warner announces re-election bid for state House of Representatives

Rep. Ryan Warner (R-52) announced Tuesday that he will seek re-election to the State House of Representatives to continue his work of protecting taxpayers, fighting for jobs and and reforming state government.

Warner is known for providing local residents with a strong conservative voice in state government and is seeking the Republican nomination in the April Primary Election.

“I was elected to put people before politics, and I have done that as state representative,” Warner said. “I am proud of my work to enable local families to keep more of their hard earned money; my fight for our hometown values; and my efforts to provide local seniors and residents with the services they need. We have made positive steps, but I know there is more that needs done for the hard-working men and women I serve. That is why I am running for re-election.”

Rep. Warner works every day to help keep families safe. He was the prime sponsor of the law that expands availability of lifesaving EpiPens and improves access to clinical trials for cancer patients.

“One of the most basic responsibilities of state government is to keep people safe,” Warner said. “This law will save lives and provide greater access to potentially life-saving treatment for more Pennsylvanians.”

In the House, Warner is respected for being a commonsense, conservative legislator who knows that residents cannot afford higher taxes, especially when the majority of these tax dollars go to Philadelphia instead of Fayette or Westmoreland counties.

He was the prime sponsor of a Constitutional Amendment to provide reasonable spending limits and a performance based budgeting bill that became law. Warner is also part of a bipartisan group of reform legislators who continue to work for a responsible budget process.

“Governor Wolf continues to propose higher taxes in order to support bigger, more expensive government,” Warner said. “I know there are better ways to balance the budget. That is why I fought for strong measures to stop welfare fraud and abuse to ensure those most in need receive help while working to reduce costs. During the budget process, I will continue to side with hard- working taxpayers by opposing Governor Wolf’s excessive tax and spend plans.”

Warner has voted to pass budgets that were fiscally responsible, focused spending on his constituents priorities and did not raise taxes.

In fact, the budget proposals he has supported provided additional funding for education and important programs that would benefit local residents, seniors and children.

Warner has also worked to secure funding to improve school safety and to refocus education on teaching children the important skills they need to succeed, rather than teaching to a test.

“As the father of two children, I support our public school system and the teachers who work hard to help prepare students to succeed after graduation,” Warner said. “That is why I supported the recent budget that provided record funds for our schools and children while holding overall state spending to less than the rate of inflation. I understand that state budgets must be effective and must be affordable to the taxpayers who fund our Commonwealth.”

Warner is a proven fiscal conservative committed to making Pennsylvania more business-friendly, and to supporting the energy and coal industries, which have a new friend in the Trump Administration.

As representative, he has opposed irresponsible federal and state policies in order to keep the job and to grow the economy to create new local jobs.

Warner has promoted the responsible development of Marcellus Shale natural gas without eliminating the impact fee, which has delivered millions of dollars for local improvements.

“The people of Fayette and Westmoreland counties have told me repeatedly that now is not the time for broadbased tax increases,” Warner said. “They want responsible fiscal leadership that cuts wasteful government spending, fosters sustainable job growth and forces government to live within its means like our families must do.”

Warner has also been an effective legislator who is fighting for his constituents values in Harrisburg.

He was proud to have both of his bipartisan bills to cut government red tape and to provide tax credits to local volunteer firefighters and EMS workers signed into law.

Warner has introduced commonsense legislation, including bills to make English the official language of Pennsylvania and to stop welfare fraud while supporting efforts to reduce the size of the legislature to save tax dollars.

He co-sponsored bills to protect pro-life, pro-Second Amendment and pro-family values. Warner has also put workers first by supporting efforts to deny public benefits to illegal immigrants.

Ryan and his wife Leslie reside in Perryopolis where they are raising their two children Paloma and Ben. They are members of St. John the Baptist Parish.

He has deep family roots in the local community and is an avid hunter and sportsman. The 52nd District includes portions of Fayette and Westmoreland counties.

52nd Legislative District

As with many of the other Legislative seats in this county, the 52nd is no different to excitement.

Incumbent Republican Ryan Warner will secure his party’s nod with 2,949 votes, while a Connellsville City Counciman, Ethan Keedy secured the Democratic nod in the 52nd with 2,747 votes. The men will face each other in the General Election in the Fall for the sole 52nd District seat.

Rep. Warner announces re-election bid for state House

Rep. Ryan Warner (R-52nd) announced that he will seek re-election to the State House of Representatives to continue his work of protecting taxpayers, fighting for jobs and values and reforming state government.

Warner is serving his second term and is known for providing local residents with a strong voice in state government.

“I was elected to put people before politics, and I have done that as state representative,” Warner said. “I am proud of my work to enable local families to keep more of their hard earn money; my fight for our hometown values; and my efforts to provide local seniors and residents with the services they need. We have made positive steps, but I know there is more that needs done for the hard-working men and women I serve. That is why I am running for re-election.” Warner continues to lead on reforming state government. During his first two terms in office, he has honored his promise to refuse the costly per diems, state car and state pension. Warner was also one of the few House members who did not accept a paycheck during the extended 2015 budget impasse.

“I grew up in a blue collar household,” Warner said. “So when I ran for election, I promised that I would continue to live like the residents I serve. That’s why I refused the costly perks and have worked so hard to reform the system to better protect taxpayers.”

In the House, Warner is respected for being a common sense legislator who knows that residents cannot afford higher taxes, especially when the majority of these tax dollars go to Philadelphia instead of Fayette or Westmoreland counties. He was a leading supporter of a Constitutional Amendment to provide reasonable spending limits, performance-based budgeting legislation that became law and is part of a bipartisan group of reform legislators who continue to work for a responsible budget process.

“Gov. Wolf continues to propose higher taxes in order to support bigger, more expensive government,” Warner said. “I know there are better ways to balance the budget. That is why I fought for strong measures to stop welfare fraud and abuse to ensure those most in need receive help while helping to reduce costs. During the budget process, I will continue to side with hard-working taxpayers by opposing Gov. Wolf’s excessive tax and spend plans.”

Warner has voted to pass budgets that were fiscally responsible, focused spending on priorities and did not raise taxes. In fact, the budget proposals he has supported provided additional funding for education and important programs that would benefit local residents, seniors and children. Warner has also worked to refocus education on teaching children the important skills they need for success, rather than teaching to a test.

“As the father of two children, I support our public school system and the teachers who work hard to help provide our kids with the skills they need to succeed after graduation,” Warner said. “That is why I supported budgets in the House that provided record funds for our schools. However, I also understand that a quality education is not just about money and must be affordable to property taxpayers. That is why I supported a historic proposal to reform the pension system, which is a driving cost to governments at all levels, but especially for school districts.”

Warner is a proven fiscal conservative committed to making Pennsylvania more business-friendly and to supporting our energy and coal industries, which have a new friend in the Trump administration. As representative, he has opposed irresponsible federal and state policies in order to keep the jobs we have and to grow the economy to create new local jobs. Warner has promoted the responsible development of Marcellus Shale natural gas without eliminating the impact fee, which has delivered millions of dollars for local improvements.

“The people of Fayette and Westmoreland counties have told me repeatedly that now is not the time for broad-based tax increases,” Warner said. “They want responsible fiscal leadership that cuts wasteful government spending, fosters sustainable job growth and forces government to live within its means like our families must do.”

Born and raised here, Ryan learned the importance of hard work, faith, family and service to others from his family. His grandfathers and their families were trusted members of our community. Charles Warner was a local farmer, and John Marks was in real estate. His father, Jim, owns and operates JTE Logging. His mother, Annette, is a branch manager at PNC Bank.

Throughout his life, Warner has helped his father with the family’s logging business. He began in high school by stacking, sorting and cutting lumber before working his way up to operating and maintaining the sawmill machinery and heavy equipment.

Warner attended Frazier High School and graduated from Penn State University. Following college, he went to work for Siemens Industry in Westmoreland County as a project controller. As a result of a tough economy, Siemens reduced its workforce and Warner was one of those who were let go after nearly five years on the job.

“My story is like many other western Pennsylvanians,” Warner said. “As state representative, I never forget the importance of providing people with a reliable safety net and effective job retraining programs when needed so they can get back to work supporting their families. I work hard every day to keep the jobs we have and to grow our economy to create new local jobs.”

Warner has also been an effective legislator who is fighting for our values in Harrisburg. His bipartisan legislation to cut government red tape was signed into law just five months after he took office. He has introduced common sense legislation including bills to make English the official language of Pennsylvania, provide tax credits to our volunteer firefighters and EMS workers and to stop wasteful government spending.

Warner co-sponsored bills to protect pro-life, pro-Second Amendment and pro-family values. He has also put workers first by supporting efforts to deny public benefits to illegal immigrants. Ryan and his wife Leslie reside in Perryopolis where they are raising their two children, Paloma and Ben. They are members of St. John the Baptist Parish. He has deep family roots in our community and is an avid hunter and sportsman.

The 52nd District includes portions of Fayette and Westmoreland counties. Warner is seeking the Republican nomination in the May primary election.

Local legislators not influenced by other states’ recreational marijuana legalization vote

By Mark Hofmann, The Herald Standard

Even though several states have voted to make recreational marijuana legal, those in and entering the Pennsylvania legislature said they have not changed their opinions on the subject.

In April, the state legislature approved the medical marijuana bil to allow people suffering from seizures to be treated with cannabis oil to reduce the number of seizures they experience.

However, on Election Day, the states of California, Nevada, Main and Massachusetts approved the legalization of recreational marijuana.

With Pennsylvania’s legalization of medical marijuana only five months old, legislators aren’t giving the idea of legalizing recreational marijuana use much weight.

“It has not changed my stance at all,” said State Sen. Patrick Stefano, R-Bullskin Township, who added he believes the four states that voted to make recreational use legal are making a mistake. “It will take a long time before I change my stance on recreational marijuana.”

Stefano voted for medical marijuana in Pennsylvania, but said h has issues with legalizing what people have called a gateway recreational drug during an ongoing opioid crisis.

“The risks would outweigh the benefits,” Stefano said. “I just don think we’re ready.”

State Rep. Ryan Warner, R-Perryopolis, said he, too, supported medical marijuana in Pennsylvania to help those with cancer an those who suffer seizures, but he believes the main focus needs to be eradicating the current drug epidemic.

“Addressing this opioid crisis should be one of the top priorities for every lawmaker in the state — not legalizing more drugs,” Ryan said.

“I don’t think it’s the right time for us in Pennsylvania to do that right now,” said State Rep. Pam Snyder, D-Jefferson Township. “We haven’t even implemented the medical cannabis bill.”

Snyder said she wants to wait and see what research comes out of those states that have legalized recreational marijuana, but said when it comes to cannabis, she wants to focus on the medical marijuana implementation in Pennsylvania first as she said it will help a lot of people and doctors.

“I am a staunch supporter of the legalization of medicinal cannabis, which is why I sponsored three amendments to the legislation that was championed by Sen. Mike Folmer and enacted into law,” said state Sen. Camera Bartolotta, R-Carroll Township. “In this day and age, Pennsylvanians who are truly suffering, medically, should not be denied every opportunity to treatment.”

Bartolotta, however, said she doesn’t support recreational cannabis.

“I believe it can lead to bigger problems, such as an increase in DUI cases,” she said, adding that parents and children with extreme seizure disorders are the ones that need to benefit from the medical use of marijuana. “That’s what this is all about —giving men, women and children with serious medical conditions the ability to live better lives.”

“Far too many medical professionals have called marijuana a gateway drug for me to be able to support (recreational) legalization currently,” said Matthew Dowling, a Republican, who will be serving the 51st Legislative District and agrees that the opioid epidemic is what needs to be addressed.

Seven states have now legalized recreational pot, and a recent Gallup poll showed close to 60 percent of Americans support the idea.

Stefano said he has heard from those in his constituency in the 32nd Senatorial District on both sides of the issue and said about 70 percent are against recreational marijuana use.

Colorado, where stores began legally selling recreational pot in 2014, reported almost $1 billion in legal pot sales last year. Arcview Market Research, which tracks the marijuana industry, estimates that legal annual California pot revenues could exceed$7 billion by 2020.

Even the potential for additional tax money going to Harrisburg’s pot sales hasn’t swayed lawmakers.

“The state of Pennsylvania doesn’t have a revenue problem, it has a spending problem,” Warner said.

While Warner said he respects the rights of individual states to make decisions that they deem best for themselves, he said Pennsylvania already has some of the highest sin taxes in the country, and rather than focusing on new similar taxes, legislato should be looking at ways to cut wasteful spending in Harrisburg

“Yes, I’m sure it’s going to generate revenue, but there’s things t take into account other than revenue,” Snyder said.

Stefano said the legalization of recreational marijuana could come with cost increases for things like drug treatment and different issues like the federal government’s restrictions on marijuana use.

“That complicates our ability to tax it,” Stefano said.

Dowling said relying on revenue from drugs is not sound public policy.

“Rather I think the states should control their costs and make cuts before following this path as a way to be able to further Gov [Tom] Wolf’s liberal agenda and outrageous spending,” Dowling said.

Republican newcomer Dowling reflects on political race

State Rep.elect Matthew Dowling continues to savor his election night victory.
The sea of Republican red that washed over Fayette County on election day paved the way for the small Uniontown business owner to overcome the odds of besting an incumbent Democrat.

Dowling said that all along he was cognizant it would be an uphill battle to unseat veteran and popular lawmaker — state Rep. Tim Mahoney, D-South Union Twp. — when he set out on his first political journey.

However, it had been done before.

County transition to GOP

In 2014 with the retirement of iconic Democrat state Sen. Richard A. Kasunic, the local stage was set for political newcomers to emerge. Then-Democratic state Rep. Deberah Kula opted to seek the senatorial seat, with many believing she would have no problem moving into the position.  However, Fayette County businessman and community leader Pat Stefano, a Republican, stepped forward to challenge Kula and won. At the same time, Republican Ryan Warner won a place on the ballot and squared off with a well-known
Democratic leader, Perry Township Supervisor A.J. Boni for Kula’s representative’s seat. Warner was victorious in his first political bid and won a second term by defeating Democrat James Mari in last week’s general election.

Last year, the county commission moved from a Democratic majority to a Republican majority with Dave Lohr joining fellow Republican Angela M. Zimmerlink on the board.
With the foundation set, Dowling had many reasons to be optimistic.

Dowling enters the race

As he looked at the demographics and how, in his opinion, the county had not flourished under the leadership of the Democrat Party, Dowling said he saw an opportunity and seized it. “I think this year — more than any — citizens were interested in new blood and new ideas,” he said. “I was personally extremely frustrated during the (2015 state) budget standoff that lasted six months.” While his nonprofit business employer was not substantially harmed by the impasse, Dowling said he was cognizant of agencies that were in jeopardy of providing needed services for senior citizens and others. “School districts had to take out a line of credit because of the budget standoff,” he said. “I think we could have come to a better and quicker solution.” Dowling said that he also saw the success of Stefano, R-Bullskin Township, and Warner, R-Perryopolis, in their efforts to elicit aid from Harrisburg for their constituencies, despite their short time in office. With the support of his family, the GOP community and his two mentors, Dowling embarked on his challenge to defeat Mahoney who was seeking a sixth term as the 51st Legislative District representative. He seized on what he saw as Mahoney’s shortfalls. “Rep. Mahoney had become — in some ways — a one-issue candidate,” said Dowling of Mahoney’s push for school consolidation. “We needed to look at other issues as well.” While not opposed to consideration of some consolidation of services, Dowling said an all-encompassing
measure is not feasible. “School boards should come together and figure that out for themselves,” he said.

As he knocked on the doors of those within the district, Dowling said he found that residents, too, were concerned about other issues, including the drug epidemic and the shortage of jobs. Although he had to sell himself to the constituency, Dowling credits his successful campaign to those that guided him through political maze like Stefano,
Warner and Somerset County state Rep. Carl Metzgar, along with the state GOP and the House Republican Campaign Committee, which offered financial help. “The Commonwealth Partners of Entrepreneurs were involved in the race using individual expenditures, meaning they were placing signs, paying for online advertising, and even running radio commercials without coordination or knowledge of the campaign,” he said. “Grassroots efforts, such as door knocking, sign coordination, phone banking, and coalition organization was handled by the Fayette and Somerset Republican Committees, and some 80 individual volunteers, many of whom had no previous involvement in political campaigns.”
Dowling, himself, visited or called upon 10,000 residents during the months leading up to the election. Volunteers made 4,000 calls, mailed 7,000 letters on behalf of the campaign, with ProLife volunteers distributing 2,500 pieces of literature just days before voters went to the polls.
“While much has been said about the mail pieces paid for by the Republican Party of PA, this campaign had a great deal of support at the grassroots level,” said Dowling. “It would have been impossible to share the message of my campaign without all involved.”
Efforts show results In early October, Dowling said the campaign began to see a shift as likely voters began to tie his name to the race. The needed connection was made,
he said, but would it translate into a win? “I knew our campaign had done everything it could, and made every contact possible,” he said. “Running a campaign is like a job interview. We made our case the best we could. “It was now going to be up to the voters to make the decision.” The 51st Legislative District includes portions of Fayette and Somerset counties. Mahoney took Fayette County by a 10,148 to 9,989 vote, with Dowling overcoming the deficit in neighboring Somerset County and adding to the total count. According to unofficial results, Dowling secured 3,282 votes to Mahoney’s 1,573 ballots.
Blue to red Warner, meanwhile, said the overwhelming Republican win developed at the federal level and trickled down to the state level as voters became weary of
the liberal agenda touted by the Democrats. “Whether it be Gov. (Tom) Wolf’s proposal for the largest tax increase in the history of Pennsylvania or President (Barack) Obama and (former)  Secretary of State Hillary Clinton’s public war against coal and natural gas, (those agendas) do not align with southwestern Pennsylvania,” said Warner.
“Most residents in Fayette and Westmoreland counties are conservative and believe in traditional American values. “They are not going to back a candidate, or a party, that supports and advocates for illegal immigration, supports higher taxes on the working class, supports jobcrushing regulations from the EPA (federal Environmental Protection Agency) or attacks our Second Amendment rights.”

Ready to serve

Dowling, meanwhile, said the outcome not only gave him the win, but also a mandate to make a difference. When he goes to Harrisburg, Dowling said he will focus on the two major issues of concern of those that elected him to office. “(Concerning the drug issue) I think that comes down to funding law enforcement,” he said. “And, we need to find the best way to provide treatment. “When it comes to the drug epidemic, I don’t think there is going to be a one size fits all approach. “It is going to be an uphill fight that is going to take awhile (to address).” Dowling added that the discussions with the residents revealed, too, that a level of corruption exists because of the long-domination of the Democratic
Party, and it must end. “There are effective people in office that deserve to be reelected,”
he said. “I learned how hard it is to come in as a newcomer and try to get someone’s
ear.” He found that in some instances, the barriers could not be broken.
“I had people that were afraid to donate to my campaign,” he said. “We need to clean up any corruption that exists out there.” Dowling will go to Harrisburg on Dec. 1 to begin the transition process. He will take the oath of office on Jan. 3.